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Previous Legislation

Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) introduced S.3072. This bill would have suspended regulation of carbon dioxide and methane from stationary sources under the Clean Air Act for two years.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) introduced legislation (Senate Joint Resolution 26) that would “disapprove” of the endangerment finding EPA concluded in December 2009, thereby closing the door to Clean Air Act regulation of greenhouse gases. On June 10, 2010, the Senate voted down this resolution 47-53.

Rep. Earl Pomeroy (D-ND) introduced legislation (H.R.4396) that would have removed six greenhouse gases (including carbon dioxide) from the definition of the word “pollutant” in the Clean Air Act, thereby leaving it to Congress to establish a new law governing greenhouse gas emissions.

Rep. Ike Skelton (D-MO) introduced legislation (H.R.4572) that would have taken a more narrow perspective. The bill would remove six greenhouse gases (including carbon dioxide) from the definition of the word “pollutant” in the Clean Air Act thereby leaving it to Congress to establish new law governing greenhouse gas emissions. However, Rep. Skelton’s bill would have limited the removal of these greenhouse gases “solely” on the basis of their “effects on global climate change.” Skelton also introduced House Joint Resolution 76 to put Congress on record as disapproving of EPA’s finding that greenhouse gases threaten the public health and welfare, and says the EPA rule shall have no force or effect.

Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX) introduced House Joint Resolution 77 that would have put Congress on record as disapproving of EPA’s finding that greenhouse gases threaten the public health and welfare, and the EPA rule shall have no force or effect.

Rep. Nick Rahall (D-WV) introduced H.R.4753. The bill would have suspended regulation of carbon dioxide and methane from stationary sources under the Clean Air Act for two years.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced H.R.391. It would have removed six greenhouse gases (including carbon dioxide) from the definition of the word “pollutant” in the Clean Air Act, thereby leaving it to Congress to establish a new law governing greenhouse gas emissions.

Sen. Mark Begich (D-AK) and West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller have led a group of six other industrial state Democrats in a letter to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson, expressing serious economic and energy security concerns about the potential regulation of greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. The other Senators are Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Carl Levin of Michigan, Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia and Max Baucus of Montana.

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